Episode 123: Exit, Pursued by a Bear

This week, Brendan's listening to some meaningless jazz, and Nathan's hanging from a tree in his underwear, while Richard rides — to destiny. All things shall soon be ours: it's Silver Nemesis.

Ungrateful wretch

The cost of our plebiscite has blown out enormously, and we reserve the right to completely ignore the result, but it's almost certainly still worth casting your vote for the Colin Baker story that will be the subject of our upcoming commentary podcast. Head over to the show notes for Episode 121 to make your views known.

Buy the story!

Silver Nemesis was released on DVD in 2010. As usual, it was released on its own in the US (Amazon US), but in the UK and Australia, it released strapped to Revenge of the Cybermen in the unimaginatively titled Cybermen box set. (Amazon UK).

This episode's title is taken from Shakespeare's most improbable stage direction, in The Winter's Tale, Act III, Scene 3, alluded to by Lady Peinforte in Part 2.

In a cut scene from Part 1, the Doctor and Ace come across a portrait of Ace painted by Gainsborough.

The jury is still out on the theory that the sun has an invisible brown dwarf companion called Nemesis, which occasionally wanders past to cause mass extinctions on Earth. Fans of this idea will also enjoy the theory that a giant planet is patrolling the borders of our solar system with the intention of one day killing us all.

Death Comes to Time was an animated webcast on the BBC website in 2001, starring Sylvester McCoy, Sophie Aldred, Jacqueline Pearce, John Sessions and Stephen Fry. It's terrible, but you can still hear it as an audiobook in the US (Audible US), or as a CD in the UK (Amazon UK).

Here's Brendan cosplaying as the Doctor in Death Comes to Time.

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam, and the logo was designed by Anthony Wells. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll pretend to be completely indifferent when you tell us your most intimate personal secrets.

Bondfinger

Over on Bondfinger, we've stalled in the middle of the Brosnan Era, and so our commentary on The World is Not Enough (1999) has been delayed. In the meantime, you can enjoy our previous commentaries on the Pierce Brosnan films, and our commentaries on the Timothy Dalton Era.

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well. Even fake ones.

You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

Episode 122: This Neocon World

This week, we're manic, reactive and endogenous, as we contemplate fondant, marshmallow, and the practical problem with leaving someone alive. Make sure you've paid your poll tax — it's time for an outing with The Happiness Patrol.

On with the Motley

In our ongoing postal plebiscite, you'll be voting on which Colin Baker story will be the subject of our next commentary podcast. Take your mind off the horrors of democracy, head over to the shownotes for Episode 121, and cast your vote.

Buy the story!

The Happiness Patrol was released on DVD in 2012. In the US, it was released on its own (Amazon US), while in the UK and Australia, it was inexplicably released as part of the Ace Adventures box set, along with Dragonfire (Amazon UK).

Richard continues to feud with the hosts of the New To Who podcast. They're all very attractive.

Dog lovers will find today's upsetting media landscape impossible to navigate without referring to doesthedogdie.com.

The sound, look and feel of this story owes a lot to noirish thriller The Third Man (1949).

Section 28 of the Local Government Act (1988) was a dogshit piece of legislation enacted by the viciously homophobic Thatcher Government that banned the "promotion" of homosexuality. It remained in force in the UK until 2003.

And here's the Monty Python sketch about Happy Valley, in which anyone unhappy was immediately put to death. Hilariously.

And here's Nathan's personal take on the idea of Frocks and Guns in Doctor Who.

Horrifically enough, Richard is right about the term Joy Division being used to refer to the practice of sexual slavery in Nazi labour camps.

Lady Land is the official TV Tropes name for the Planet of Women trope.

Neither Richard nor Nathan have ever even heard of T-Bag, a British TV programme about a weird witch who travelled around time and space collecting weird objects. For the last few years of the show, T-Bag was played by Georgina Hale, our very own Priscilla P. (It's horrifically bad. Take a look at one of the episodes from Season 3 here.)

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam, and the logo was designed by Anthony Wells. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll run off with your husband in your personal escape shuttle. We're done it before.

Bondfinger

Our commentary on The World is Not Enough (1999) will be released this weekend, probably, but while you're waiting you can enjoy our previous commentaries on the Pierce Brosnan films, and our commentaries on the Timothy Dalton Era.

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well. Even the fake ones that weren't included in the official box set.

You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

Episode 121: Daleks Are Forever

Flight Through Entirety roars back into the feed with one of its best episodes ever, in which we go back to the very beginning of the history of the show and subtly reference tons of things we’ve done before. Except for Shirley Bassey as Davros. We’ve never done that, I think.

A web of mayhem and intrigue

Once again, it’s time for you to vote for another story for our next commentary podcast, currently scheduled for release in a few weeks, after our discussion of Season 25 comes to a close.

Your choice *

Buy the story!

Are you sitting comfortably? After its original DVD release in 2001/2002, Remembrance of the Daleks: Special Edition was released in the UK and Australia as part of The Davros Collection in 2007 (Amazon UK). It was later released on its own in 2009 in the UK (Amazon UK), and in 2010 in the US (Amazon US).

Jodie Whittaker is the Doctor!

And here’s what Brian Blessed said when he first met the Dalai Lama.

The last time Moffat oversaw the Twelfth Doctor’s regeneration into a woman was in his very first Doctor Who story, The Curse of Fatal Death.

Ben Aaronovitch is now a well-regarded author, famous for his six-book Rivers of London series, which deals with a young policemen who works in a divison of the Metropolitan Police that deals with the supernatural. The first novel was inexplicably called Midnight Riot in the US.

The novelisation of Remembrance of the Daleks is excellent, and is actually available on Amazon. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK) (Amazon AU)

Counter-Measures is a series of Big Finish audios featuring Rachel Jensen, Allison Williams and Group Captain Ian “Chunky” Gillmore battling various alienesque threats in 1960s London.

The Profumo affair refers to a scandal in which the Secretary of State, John Profumo was forced to resign as a result of his 1961 affair with Christine Keeler, who may have been in a relationship with Yevgey Ivanov, a Soviet naval attaché; it contributed to the resignation of Prime Minister Harold Macmillan in October 1963, just weeks before the first episode of Doctor Who aired. It was dramatised in the film, Scandal (1989), starring our very own Ian McKellen and John Hurt.

Scottish comedian Susan Calman, from Radio 4’s The News Quiz talks about how she plans to dress when she’s cast as Doctor Who.

Doctor Who’s first script editor David “Jodie” Whitaker was involved in the production of three Dalek Annuals featuring original stories and articles: The Dalek Book (1964), The Dalek World (1965) and The Dalek Outer Space Book (1966).

David Banks wrote a coffee-table book called Cybermen, which explains everything you never wanted to know about why the Cybermen changed their costumes all the time.

Fans of Australian podcast episodes about Remembrance of the Daleks will enjoy the latest episode of New to Who, a podcast in which Colin, Daniel and Steven discuss Doctor Who stories you might actually want to watch.

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam, and the logo was designed by Anthony Wells. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

Brendan recounts his experiences reading his way through the Doctor Who novels on his blog, The Doctor Who Reader.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we’ll come round to your local high school and draw anachronistic graffiti all over the walls.

Bondfinger

Over on Bondfinger, we have now released two commentaries on the Pierce Brosnan films, to match our two commentaries on the Timothy Dalton Era.

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well. Even fake ones.

You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

Episode 120: Carrying an Offensive Commentary

This week, we give Sylvester McCoy a brief holiday while we revisit a Doctor Who story with some actual women in it. Which seems like the right thing to do nowadays. Sausage sandwiches at the ready, everyone: it's our commentary on The Stones of Blood.

Buy the story!

In the US, you can buy The Stones of Blood by itself (Amazon US), or as part of the Key to Time box set (Amazon US). In the UK, it's only available as part of the Key to Time box set. (Amazon UK)

You can find a much more concise and sensible discussion of this story in our regular episode about The Stones of BloodEpisode 58: The Fool Idwal Morgan, recorded in December 2015. Makes you think.

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam, and the logo was designed by Anthony Wells. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

Brendan recounts his experiences reading his way through the Doctor Who novels on his blog, The Doctor Who Reader.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll write a monograph about something and make you look a fool.

Bondfinger

Next week on Bondfinger, we're planning to record our commentary on Pierce Brosnan's good Bond film, The World is Not Enough (1999), which was released just months after The Phantom Menace. While you're waiting for that, you can listen to our two previous Brosnan commentaries, as well as our commentaries on the Timothy Dalton films.

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well.

You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

Episode 119: A Really, Really Good Length

After acquiring a mysterious treasure map from a German Expressionist filmmaker, Richard goes off to discover a fabulous treasure hidden deep in the bowels of a space mall, while Brendan and Nathan stay behind pouring milkshakes on each other. It's Dragonfire.

Well, that's democracy for you

You now have less than a week to vote for a Peter Davison story to be the subject of yet another FTE commentary podcast; we'll be announcing the result at the end of our Tom Baker commentary episode next week.

To cast your vote, just visit the shownotes for Episode 116.

Buy the story!

Dragonfire was released on DVD in 2012. It was released on its own in the US (Amazon US), of course, but in Australia and the UK, it was released as part of the Ace Adventures box set, along with The Happiness Patrol, for some reason (Amazon UK).

Tony Osoba plays Kracauer, one of Kane's followers. This is the second of three Doctor Who appearances: he was previously a Movellan in Destiny of the Daleks, and will go on to play an astronaut in Kill the Moon. He was also in Charles Chilton's Space Force 2, a BBC science fiction radio series which served as a sequel to Chilton's Journey into Space. He also appeared in Porridge, starring Ronnie Barker, in which he played a black Scotsman, which was apparently a hilarious thing in the 1970s.

Australia's answer to Martha Stewart (without the criminal record) was called Tonia Todman, and who expected her to turn up in this episode? She's still with us, apparently, and seems to have outlived her fame, such as it was.

Big Finish have staged a reunion between the Seventh Doctor, Mel and Ace in A Life of Crime, Fiesta of the Damned and Maker of Demons.

Coincidentally, many of this story's characters share names with famous figures in the history of film criticism, including Pudovkin, Kracauer, Belazs (nearly) and Eisenstein.

The guard's line about "the semiotic thickness of a performed text", which we are all terribly fond of, is a direct quote from Doctor Who: The Unfolding Text, which was an early attempt at academic criticism of Doctor Who.

Nathan mentions a version of the Sylvester McCoy title sequence created in 2016 by Cloister Productions using modern CGI in less than 24 hours.

Dominic Glynn did a full stereo remix of his version of the Doctor Who theme for The Trial of a Time Lord box set in 2008.

Picks of the week

Brendan

Brendan recommends a Big Finish audio starring Sylvester McCoy and Bonnie Langford: Flip Flop, which consists of two discs that can be played in either order. Big Finish calls it "a unique innovation in storytelling", which is sweet of them.

Nathan

Nathan recommends getting a subscription to Audible (US) (UK) (AU), where you can buy audiobook versions of many of the Doctor Who Target novelisations, particularly Delta and the Bannermen read by Bonnie Langford.

Richard

Richard goes all highbrow on us this week, recommending the films of Japanese screenwriter and director Akira Kurosawa, including Ran (1985), Yojimbo (1961), and The Hidden Fortress (1958.

He also recommends the films of Josef von Sternberg, particularly those starring William Hartnell–lookalike Marlene Dietrich, including The Scarlet Empress (1934), Morocco (1930) and Shanghai Express (1932).

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam, and the logo was designed by Anthony Wells. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

Brendan recounts his experiences reading his way through the Doctor Who novels on his blog, The Doctor Who Reader.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll lounge around in the emergency services tea room ignoring your increasingly urgent messages about that ice jam in the upper docking bay.

Bondfinger

Over on Bondfinger, we're halfway through our flight through the Pierce Brosnan era, with commentaries on GoldenEye and Tomorrow Never Dies. Fans of things much better than those films will enjoy our commentaries on the Timothy Dalton films. Or will they?

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well.

You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

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Episode 118: Bitter and Painful

It’s 1950s night at Flight Through Entirety, which means putting on bobby socks, combing Brylcreem through our remaining hair (if any), and leaving our copies of The Doctor Who Monster Book at home. It’s Delta and the Bannermen.

Er, just remind me. What day is it again?

As a valued listener of FTE, it is your democratic right to inflict a particular Peter Davison story on us, which we can inflict, in turn, upon your fellow listeners.

To cast your vote in our Peter Davison commentary poll, just go to the shownotes for Episode 116.

Buy the story!

Delta and the Bannermen was released on DVD in 2009. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

Well, the ur-source of this story is the long-running 1980s sitcom Hi-de-Hi!, set in a 1950s holiday camp, starring Ruth Madoc, former wife of our very own Philip Madoc (in fishnets).

The Tollmaster was played by Ken Dodd, who earned a place in The Guinness Book of Records for the longest joke-telling session ever — 1,500 jokes in three and a half hours. (Not four days, sadly.) Other actors considered for the role included comedian and stand-up comic Bob Monkhouse, and Doctor Who-impersonator and part-time Roman Emperor Christopher Biggins.

Weissmuller is played by Stubby Kaye, who is best known for his role as Nicely-Nicely Johnson in Guys and Dolls.

The music in this story is provided by Keff McCulloch, apart from one track during the Doctor and Ray’s hunt for Delta and Billy — The Devil’s Galop by Charles Williams. Fans of Keff’s work will also enjoy the Doctor Who 25th Anniversary Album, particularly the track “8891 Royale”.

Goronwy was played by Hugh Lloyd, who had a massively long career. You can see him here as lonely pensioner Billy in Victoria Wood as Seen on TV. He also appeared in Hancock’s Half Hour and starred alongside Terry Scott in his own show Hugh and I.

Bannerman costume designs by Akira Kurosawa.

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam, and the logo was designed by Anthony Wells. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

Brendan recounts his experiences reading his way through the Doctor Who novels on his blog, The Doctor Who Reader.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or all three of us will wander around after you, making goo-goo eyes and occasionally swiping your medication.

Bondfinger

Over on Bondfinger, we have now released two commentaries on the Pierce Brosnan films, to match our two commentaries on the mercilessly (or mercifully) short Timothy Dalton Era. (We own him, remember?)

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well.

You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

Episode 117: Thatcher’s Britain

This week, Richard’s admiring the architecture, Brendan wants to say how-you-do, and Nathan has had a disappointingly small meal and is still feeling a little peckish. We’re all trapped in an excitingly hopeful modernist dystopia, so what else could it be but Paradise Towers?

Attendance is compulsory

Once again, we’re asking you to shape the future of this podcast by nominating a Peter Davison story to cover in our next commentary episode. But beware: this time the choice comes with potentially complex interpersonal repercussions.

To cast your vote, just go to the shownotes for Episode 116.

Buy the story!

Paradise Towers was released on DVD in 2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

Le Corbusier was a French architect who was massively fond of steel, concrete and plate glass, and who would probably have enjoyed more than a few astringent beverages with Kroagnon in Space Architect School.

High-Rise tells the story of “a class war…inside a luxurious apartment block”. It was written by J G Ballard, about whom Richard has some surprising things to say.

David Snell was originally commissioned to write the incidental music for this story, but his score was rejected by JNT, and Keff McCulloch ended up hastily writing a replacement score instead. Snell's score is available as a DVD extra.

Deputy Chief Caretaker Clive Merrison played Sherlock Holmes alongside Michael Williams as Watson for BBC Radio 4, covering every canonical Sherlock Holmes story. They're all available from Audible, so go out and buy them immediately.

In Understanding Media, Marshall McLuhan talked about the differences between hot and cold media, which are concepts dear to the heart of any Doctor Who fan who has ever attempted to watch the Loose Cannon reconstruction of The Space Pirates.

Big Finish tackles some of this story's themes in Spaceport Fear by William Gallagher, starring Colin Baker and Bonnie Langford.

Steven Wyatt had got the job partly on the basis of Claws, a TV play starring Brenda Blethyn and Todd's beloved Mary Morris. It's about cat people. Like Survival, I imagine.

And, as always, we come back to Totally Tasteless: The Life of John Nathan Turner by Richard Marson. JNT was a gay, you know.

And going slightly more highbrow, Richard alludes to The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction by Walter Benjamin, which discusses the implications of our newfound technological ability to experience works of art whenever and wherever we like.

Brendan mentions the fraught political history of Yooka-Laylee, which actually looks like a lot of fun.

The Pruitt-Igoe public housing project seems like it was a massive conglomeration of dozens of Paradise Towers in St Louis, Missouri. Read about it here.

Doctor Who creator Sydney Newman offered Michael Grade some surprising advice about how to fix Doctor Who in the 1980s. More information about this is available as a DVD extra on the Time and the Rani DVD.

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam, and the logo was designed by Anthony Wells. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

Brendan recounts his experiences reading his way through the Doctor Who novels on his blog, The Doctor Who Reader.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or before you know it Brendan will be cosplaying as you and trying to deceive all your closest friends.

Bondfinger

Yesterday we released a new commentary on the second Pierce Brosnan film, Tomorrow Never Dies. If we put that side by side with our commentary on GoldenEye, we’ll have a pair.

Of course, you can still catch our commentaries on both films of the Timothy Dalton era.

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well.

You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

Episode 116: Terrified of Tinsel

Richard makes a triumphant return to the podcast just in time for the start of the Sylvester McCoy era. And the Rani’s back too, cosplaying as Brendan for some reason. It’s Time and the Rani.

So free will is not an illusion after all

Every time we turn around it’s election season, and here at Flight Through Entirety, things are no different. This time we want you to vote for a Peter Davison story for our upcoming commentary podcast, scheduled for release after we finish Season 25.

Your chosen story *

Buy the story!

Time and the Rani was released on DVD in 2010/2011. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

Philip Sandifer has posted a video blog in which he explains why he thinks the visual style of this story is a vast improvement. Scroll to the bottom of his discussion of this story, or, better still, read the whole thing.

Fans of terrible dialogue and refreshingly simplistic plots will also enjoy Pip and Jane’s episode of Space: 1999, which is called A Matter of Balance. (That’s a link to the actual episode, by the way, so click carefully.)

The story of King Solomon’s wisdom can be found in 1 Kings 3:16–28.

Mrs Malaprop was a hilarious comedy aunt from Sheridan’s play The Rivals (1775), famous for continually choosing the wrong word; despite that, she was the very pineapple of politeness.

Brendan’s quixotic quest to read every original Doctor Who novel is insightfully and entertainingly chronicled on his blog, The Doctor Who Reader.

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam, and the logo was designed by Anthony Wells. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or before you know it Brendan will be cosplaying as you and trying to deceive all your closest friends.

Bondfinger

Over on Bondfinger, we’ve just recorded a new commentary on the second Pierce Brosnan film, Tomorrow Never Dies (1997). We’ll be releasing that this week. In the meantime, feel free to enjoy more of Pierce in our commentary on GoldenEye (1995).

Of course, you can still catch our commentaries on both films of the Timothy Dalton era.

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

Episode 115: The London Commentary Quartet

Another commentary podcast: this week, it's Jon Pertwee in Death to the Daleks!

When their holiday to Florana is unexpectedly cancelled, Brendan, Nathan, Todd and Richard all find themselves stranded in a freezing alien quarry wearing nothing but skimpy bikinis and water wings. And none of their iPhones are working, for some reason.

Buy the story!

Death to the Daleks was released on DVD in 2012. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

For a less lengthy and much more tightly edited take on this story, you should listen to Episode 29: Sand in Your Parrinium. In that episode, we discuss the the first three stories of Pertwee's final season — The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs and Death to the Daleks.

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. And more surprising and completely reliable information about the show can be found at @FTEwhofacts.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we'll unexpectedly spin around screeching and then explode for no reason.

Bondfinger

Over on Bondfinger, we'll be recording a new Pierce Brosnan commentary in the next week or so, probably, so while you're waiting for that, you can enjoy more of Pierce in our latest commentary — GoldenEye (1995).

Of course, you can still catch our commentaries on both films of the Timothy Dalton era.

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.

Episode 114: Never Going to Win

We’ve reached the end of Doctor Who’s longest era: an era in which every single story was a 14-episode epic about cannibalism and Gallifreyan jurisprudence. But, despite Eric Saward, there are still nice things to say.

Those of you not from Australia won’t understand our references to the only sitcom in Australian television history, Mother and Son, starring Garry McDonald as highly-strung botanist Arthur Bruchner.

Despite the much-criticised loveliness of his era of Doctor Who, even Russell T Davies can go horribly dark and cynical: fans of harrowing things will be deeply upset by Cucumber episode 6.

People who hate Colin’s coat, which is basically everyone, might be slightly less annoyed by this footage of Colin wearing a blue version of his costume.

Brendan nearly recommends Colin’s Doctor and Evelyn in the Big Finish audio Arrangements for War. But, you know, spoiler alert: you need to know a bit about Evelyn’s character to appreciate it. You might want to start with her first story The Marian Conspiracy.

Do you mind not standing on my chest? My hat’s on fire

Don’t forget to vote for the story you want us to cover in our upcoming Tom Baker commentary podcast. Click over to the shownotes for Episode 109 and make your choice. Voting will be closing soon.

Follow us!

Brendan is on Twitter as @critiqaltheory, Nathan is @nathanbottomley, Todd is @toddbeilby, and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast.

We’re also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on iTunes, or we’ll damn with faint praise your entire era as the star of Doctor Who.

Bondfinger

Over on Bondfinger, we’ve now released our first commentary of the Pierce Brosnan’s era, the highly-regarded GoldenEye (1995).

Of course, you can still catch our commentaries on both films of the Timothy Dalton era.

We also have plenty of Rodgecasts online, and there are other Bonds available, as well. You can keep up with all the Bondfinger news on Twitter and Facebook.