Episode 11: Bum Wetting

It's the end of an era. In this episode, Brendan, Richard and Nathan say goodbye to the Doctor and hello to his suspicious new replacement, as we discuss The Smugglers, The Tenth Planet and The Power of the Daleks.

Thank you. It's good. Keep warm.

Buy the Stories!

The Smugglers is completely missing, but an audio version is available, narrated by the delightful Anneke Wills. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

The Tenth Planet has been released on DVD, with an animated version of the missing Episode 4. One of the special features is a rare interview with William Hartnell. (Amazon US) (Amazon UK)

And, heartbreakingly, The Power of the Daleks is also completely missing. As usual, an audio version is available, narrated by the beautiful Anneke Wills. (Audible US) (Audible UK)

The Smugglers

Did you know that The Smugglers has no music at all? (Awkward silence…)

Imagine two hip young people teaching the older generation about their fab mod ways: it's not Richard's longed-for alt-universe Season 4 with Billy, Ben and Polly: it's It's Trad, Dad!. To appreciate the full horror of this film, take a look at this. I dare you.

Dr Syn was a retired pirate posing as a clergyman while working as a smuggler in a series of novels by Russell Thorndike, written in the early 20th century.

And no episode's shownotes would be complete without our obligatory reference to a Carry On film. This week: Carry On Jack (1963), which chronicles the adventures of midshipman Alfred Poop-Decker. Sigh.

The Tenth Planet

Dr Philip Sandifer's essay on this story is very strange and interesting. Read it.

The Big Finish audio adventure Spare Parts tells the story of the Genesis of the Cybermen. It's unmissably good.

The late Majel Barrett-Roddenberry played the Enterprise computer in both Star Trek and Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Aleister Crowley and H. P. Lovecraft are possible influences on the Cybermen's dark mirror of Enlightenment.

And Brigadier-General Jack D. Ripper from Dr Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) is a possible influence on the crazy Z-bomb antics of General Cutler in Episode 3.

The Power of the Daleks

We're too impressed by the story itself to spend much time on obscure cultural references. So no strange links for you here. Why not read what the Wife in Space thought about it?

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